Science Podcast: 2013

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20 December 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to a special show on this year’s breakthrough, runners up, and the top stories from our daily news site. < [MP3] >
  • Deputy news editor Robert Coontz discusses highlights from the year in science and Jennifer Couzin-Frankel talks about the breakthrough of the year: cancer immunotherapy.
(23 minutes)

13 December 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on fear-enhanced odor detection, the latest news from the Curiosity mission, and more. < [MP3] >
  • John McGann discusses with Sarah Crespi the power of fearful smells to alter the sensory machinery of the nose.
  • Richard Kerr talks to Linda Poon about the latest results from the Curiosity team in their hunt for traces of ancient life on Mars.
(30 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

6 December 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on noisy gene expression, results from drilling at the Tohoku-oki fault, the benefits of snake venom, and more. < [MP3] >
  • Alvaro Sanchez talks to Linda Poon about the factors that govern transcriptional kinetics in noisy gene expression.
  • Emily Brodsky and Sarah Crespi chat about the results from a drilling expedition at the Tohoku-oki fault.
  • Kai Kupferschmidt and Kristy Hamilton discuss the possibilities of using snake venom to heal rather than harm.
(28 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

29 November 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on the top children’s books of 2013, what newlyweds know about their prospects for happiness, authorship for sale in China, and more. < [MP3] >
  • Maria Sosa discusses the 2014 Science Books and Films Prizes for Excellence in Science Books with Kristy Hamilton.
  • James McNulty describes his work with implicit measures of marriage satisfaction in an interview with Sarah Crespi.
  • Mara Hvistendahl talks with Linda Poon about an investigation of questionable publishing practices in China.
(27 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

22 November 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on the minimum requirements for a Y chromosome, the future of US missile defense, details of an extraordinary gamma-ray burst, and more. < [MP3] >
  • Monika Ward and Kristy Hamilton chat about swapping the entire Y chromosome for two genes.
  • Eliot Marshall and Sarah Crespi discuss the uncertain future of the US's intercontinental missile interception program.
  • Sylvia Zhu talks with Linda Poon about an exceptionally bright gamma-ray burst.
(38 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

15 November 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on the origin of domestic dogs, tracking adaption over 50,000 generations, ramping up solar power with perovskites, and more. < [MP3] >
  • Robert Wayne and Linda Poon discuss how genetic analysis of ancient canines places the origin of dog domestication in Europe.
  • Richard Lenski explains to Sarah Crespi the dynamics of asexual bacterial adaptation revealed through his ongoing 25-year experiment.
  • Robert Service introduces Kristy Hamilton to the hot prospects of perovskite-based solar cells.
(44 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

8 November 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on chasing a meteorite to ground, using science to adapt to climate change, the other malaria, and more. < [MP3] >
  • Peter Jenniskens and Kristy Hamilton discuss findings from the asteroid that crash-landed in Russia earlier this year.
  • Richard Moss and Sarah Crespi talk about using science to prepare for climate change.
  • Gretchen Vogel chats with Linda Poon about eradicating the "forgotten malaria."
(43 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

1 November 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on neural correlates for music and speech learning, understanding the role of scars in spinal cord injury, deep-brain stimulation for depression, and more. < [MP3] >
  • Robert Zatorre talks to Linda Poon about predispositions and neural plasticity in music and speech learning.
  • Jonas Frisén and Kristy Hamilton discuss the key players of scar generation following spinal cord injury.
  • Emily Underwood and Sarah Crespi track the progress on treating depression with deep-brain stimulation.
(38 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

25 October 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on shaping liquids with nanoparticles, eating scorpions with ease, the first Americans, and more. < [MP3] >
  • Ashlee Rowe talks with Sarah Crespi about how grasshopper mice evolved to be insensitive to pain from a scorpion's sting.
  • Thomas Russell teaches Linda Poon how to distort the shape of a droplet immersed in another liquid.
  • Michael Balter and Sarah Crespi discuss what the genome sequence of a 24,000 year-old Siberian boy says about the origin of the first Americans.
(42 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

18 October 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on a fungus deadly to frogs, Denisovans in Southeast Asia, the U.S. government shutdown's effect on science, and more. < [MP3] >
  • Louise Rollins-Smith talks with Kristy Hamilton about a fungus that is decimating frog populations.
  • Alan Cooper and Sarah Crespi discuss the distribution of Denisovan DNA in modern human populations.
  • Jeffrey Mervis speaks with Linda Poon about how the U.S. government shutdown is creating gaps in decades-long data sets.
(43 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

11 October 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories about gaps in the evidence for newborn screenings, modeling the formation of the moon, removing nitrogen from lakes, and more. < [MP3] >
  • Bridget Wilcken talks with Kristy Hamilton about the lack of evidence for many newborn screenings.
  • Daniel Clery and Sarah Crespi review the evidence for different models of the formation of the moon.
  • Jacques Finlay discusses with Linda Poon the difficulties of reducing phosphorous pollution without causing nitrogen accumulation in lakes.
(39 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

4 October 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on taming mercury in the environment, news from the Curiosity rover, codon bias in bacterial genes, and more. < [MP3] >
  • John Bohannon describes to Kristy Hamilton what his sting operation reveals about the dark side of open-access publishing.
  • Jon Cohen talks with Sarah Crespi about sparsely attended conferences that maybe taking advantage of unsuspecting scientists.
  • Jennifer Couzin-Franken joins Linda Poon to break down the misperceptions and benefits of publishing negative results.
  • Dan Kahan discusses how faulty science communication approaches have failed to resolve controversies over vaccinations with Sarah Crespi.
(43 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

27 September 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on taming mercury in the environment, news from the Curiosity rover, codon bias in bacterial genes, and more. < [MP3] >
  • David Malakoff tackles the scourge of mercury pollution with Linda Poon.
  • Laurie Leshin discusses new findings from the Mars Curiosity rover with Sarah Crespi.
  • Sriram Kosuri breaks down the N-terminal codon bias in bacterial genes with Kristy Hamilton.
(42 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

20 September 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on the deep history of animals on the planet, coexisting with carnivores, Earth's atmosphere more than 3 billion years ago, and more. < [MP3] >
  • Paul Smith looks back with Kristy Hamilton at the causes of the Cambrian explosion 530 million years ago.
  • Virginia Morell talks with Sarah Crespi about the resurgence of carnivorous animals right in our backyards.
  • Bernard Marty discusses with Linda Poon about the nitrogen composition in Earth's atmosphere over 3 billion years ago during the Archean eon.
(39 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

13 September 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on DNA and disasters, new immunological weapons against HIV, Voyager's latest exit, and more. < [MP3] >
  • Alex John London discusses the role and feasibility of DNA identification in disaster zones with Kristy Hamilton.
  • Michel Nussenzweig talks with Sarah Crespi about a new approach to HIV that uses antibodies from infected patients.
  • Richard Kerr chats with Linda Poon about new data that suggests the Voyager spacecraft has left our solar system for good.
(43 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

6 September 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on the social learning of bird migration, stretchable and transparent ionic conductors, fecal transplants, and more. < [MP3] >
  • Thomas Mueller discusses the crucial role of social learning in bird migration.
  • Zhigang Suo talks about new applications for improved stretchable and transparent ionic conductors.
  • Jop de Vrieze breaks down the feasibility and effectiveness of fecal transplants to fight off diseases.
(36 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

30 August 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on failed stars, numerosity in the brain, monitoring a North Korean volcano, and more. < [MP3] >
  • Trent Dupuy speaks with Linda Poon on the newly strengthened connection between the coldest brown dwarfs and gas giant planets.
  • Science's Kristine Hamilton and Ben Harvey discuss the new evidence for a numerosity map in the brain.
  • Richard Stone talks with Sarah Crespi about science diplomacy at the foot of a volatile North Korean volcano.
(39 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

23 August 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on what's ticking with atomic clocks, ribosomopathies, defending the earth against asteroids, and more. < [MP3] >
  • Andrew Ludlow discusses an even more accurate atomic clock than what we have today.
  • Susan Baserga talks about the mysterious diseases caused by faulty ribosomes.
  • Robert Irion speaks with Kristy Hamilton about defending the Earth against asteroids.
(44 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

16 August 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on preventing pesticide suicides, RNAi for bugs, manipulating the plant immune system, and more. < [MP3] >
  • Mara Hvistendahl discusses locking up pesticides to prevent suicides.
  • Kai Kupferschmidt talks about an RNA interference technique to tackle pests.
  • Jeff Dangl speaks with Kristy Hamilton about re-engineering plant immunity.
(37 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

9 August 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on dangerous buildings, a malaria vaccine, post-publication peer review, and more. < [MP3] >
  • Roger Bilham discusses how earthquakes can transform buildings into weapons of mass destruction.
  • Robert Seder speaks with Kristy Hamilton about a new Phase 1 clinical trial vaccine for malaria.
  • Jennifer Couzin-Frankel talks about the pros and cons of PubPeer anonymity.
(42 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

2 August 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories from our Special Issue on Natural Systems in Changing Climates, including patterns of ecosystem change, infectious disease shifting with climate, migrating marshes, and moving from ice-box oceans to a hot-tub planet. < [MP3] >
  • Richard Norris describes how what we know about past oceans can help predict marine conditions in a warmer furture.
  • Jessica Blois talks with Science's Kristy Hamilton about the history of ecosystem responses to climate change.
  • Sonia Altizer speaks with Science's Sarah Crespi about how the distribution of infectious disease in wildlife and humans might change under a shifting climate.
  • Eli Kintisch looks into the question: "Can marshes migrate to safety?"
(43 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

26 July 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on our many genomes, implanting false memories in mice, science in Turkey, and more. < [MP3] >
  • James Lupski talks about what having multiple genomes might mean for human health and development.
  • Susumu Tonegawa describes his group's work implanting false memories in mice.
  • John Bohannon visits Turkey during tumultous times and investigates the impact of shifting politcs on science in the country.
(43 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

19 July 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on interdisciplinary buildings, an isthmus miracle, measuring the martian atmosphere, and more. < [MP3] >
  • Maria-Paz Gutierrez talks about the convergence of various disciplines and design scales to advance sustainable architecture.
  • Richard Stone breaks down the ongoing debate on when the formation of the Isthmus of Panama took place.
  • Christopher Webster describes how high-accuracy isotope ratio measurements taken by Curiosity from Mars' atmosphere act as a window into the Red Planet's past.
(42 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

12 July 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on how autonomic nerves contribute to early prostate cancer development, the hazards of human-made earthquakes, and shiny beetles.< [MP3] >
  • Claire Magnon describes how autonomic nerves that form near and within the tumor can make prostate cancer more aggressive.
  • William Ellsworth discusses why industries, regulatory agencies, and the public should be aware of the hazards of earthquakes induced by human activities like wastewater injection and mining.
  • Unlike other animals and plants, beetles get their color and iridescent glow not by pigment molecules but by photonic crystals. Elizabeth Pennisi talks about the research done to better understand the structure and evolution of these crystals.
(36 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

5 July 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on ultrahigh magnetoresistance at room temperature, the roots of plant domestication, and bird brains in the PET scanner.< [MP3] >
  • Wilfred van der Wiel talks about obtaining ultrahigh magnetoresistance at room temperature using 1-dimensional organic wires.
  • Simone Riehl describes an archaeobotanical assemblage that spans the transition period from foraging to farming in the Zagros Mountains of Iran.
  • As birds earn recognition for their intelligence, scientists are taking a closer look at bird brains using PET scans. Virginia Morell describes the state of the research.
(31 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

28 June 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on the fate of topsoil microbes under climate change, observations from Voyager 1, attacking cancer with the immune system, and more. < [MP3] >
  • As Voyager 1 makes its way across the threshold into interstellar space, Edward Stone describes the signals that have been sent back.
  • Ferran Garcia-Pichel predicts how soil microbes will respond to temperature changes across the globe and why scientists need to pay attention.
  • The fight against cancer gets personal as Jennifer Couzin-Frankel discusses how doctors can use each patient's own T cells to attack cancer cells.
(40 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

21 June 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on a new brain database, the 100th anniversary of Bohr's atomic theory, the fate of U.S. research powerhouses, and more. < [MP3] >
  • Katrin Amunts discusses a new kind of brain map, created using thin MRI slices that capture the folds, fibers, and neurons at ultra-high resolution.
  • This year, Niels Bohr's atomic theory turns 100. David Clary talks about why it was so revolutionary back in the early 20th century, and how it's stood the test of time.
  • The final installment in a six-part series on global research universities, Jeff Mervis asks: how long can the United States stay on top?
(40 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

14 June 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on an ancient strain of leprosy, detecting the planet's water from space, results from EarthScope, and more. < [MP3] >
  • The bacterium responsible for leprosy can remain intact for centuries in its host. In an effort to untangle the history of the disease, Stewart Cole and colleagues have compared the genomes of modern bacteria to that found in the bones of people that lived up to a thousand years ago.
  • Remote sensing technologies have revolutionized how we view the Earth system. Now, James Famiglietti tells us about GRACE, a satellite that detects and monitors the movement of water on the Earth's surface.
  • Richard Kerr discusses what the EarthScope project's arrays of seismographs, lines of GPS trackers, and deep boreholes can tell us about the geophysics of North America.
(44 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

7 June 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on Pacific hydrology, mini-guts in a dish, the mysteries of development, and more. < [MP3] >
  • Under the right conditions, stems cells can divide and form mini-organs in the lab. Hans Clevers discusses the possibilities that this type of cell culture has in studying development and curing disease--including re-growing the intestinal lining.
  • How do organisms know when to stop growing? Why do so many neurons in the brain commit suicide? Deputy News Editor John Travis addresses these and other quandaries related to this week's special section on the mysteries of development.
  • Scientists are making progress understanding how the Earth's climate responds to climate forcings like pollution, solar radiation, and the greenhouse effect--but less known is how regional climate systems respond. Stacy Carolin explains how ancient stalagmites in Borneo can help to answer this question.
(42 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

31 May 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on putting graphene's strength to the test, radiation on the way to Mars, alleviating India's poverty through science, and more. < [MP3] >
  • Graphene, a one-atom-thick sheet of carbon, is so thin it's essentially two-dimensional--and yet, it's the strongest material ever tested. Jeffrey Kysar talks about testing graphene's strength as manufacturing processes scale up.
  • Just how nasty is the radiation outside Earth's atmosphere? Cary Zeitlin discusses radiation levels measured on the Curiosity rover's trip to Mars and what it might mean for a crewed mission to the Red Planet.
  • Smartphones can be used for more than just texting and checking email. Contributing Correspondent Pallava Bagla talks about the modern technologies being deployed in India to alleviate poverty and strengthen democracy.
(43 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

24 May 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on paying for blood, cockroach adaptations, the future of a long-running natural experiment, and more. < [MP3] >
  • The world is in constant need of blood. Nicola Lacetera discusses some incentives that might help recruit enough donors to meet the demand.
  • DCoby Schal explains why increasing glucose aversion in cockroaches is important for evolution - and pesticides.
  • According to Christine Mlot, a natural experiment involving the isolated Isle Royale's moose and wolf populations may be petering out.
(43 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

17 May 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on fracking, troubling science software, the science of taste, and more.< [MP3] >
  • Hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," a technology being used to extract natural gas from shale and other difficult rock formations, is causing concern for drinking water safety. Radisav Vidic reviews what is known about fracking and makes suggestions for improving environmental monitoring.
  • Does software adapt to science, or does science adapt to software? Lucas Joppa discusses troubling science software trends and argues for the peer review of scientific software.
  • Sweet, salty, bitter, sour, umami: Kai Kupferschmidt catches up with food scientists for the latest in the genetics, physiology, and psychology of flavor.
(45 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

10 May 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on markets and morality, origins for cirrus clouds, capturing an asteroid, and more.< [MP3] >
  • Do markets erode moral principles? Armin Falk takes us through the evidence.
  • Wispy cirrus clouds cover 30 percent of the sky. Dan Cziczo and colleagues sought their origins using specialized cloud-capturing aircraft.
  • Without money to get astronauts to an asteriod, NASA is taking a controversial tactic to bring one closer to Earth. Richard Kerr explains the debate surrounding the plan.
(47 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

3 May 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories from our special issue on exoplanets, middle Earth happenings, and more.< [MP3] >
  • What makes a planet hospitable to life? According to Sara Seager, scientists should expand their definition of the exoplanet "habitable zone."
  • Lizzie Wade takes us on a tour of some of the weirder and wackier exoplanets that have been discovered so far.
  • Why mantle geochemistry matters: Elizabeth Cottrell connects mantle oxidation state to mid-ocean ridge basalts and the global carbon cycle.
(41 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

26 April 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on social networking in whales, a pulsar's affirmation of general relativity, monitoring TB in North Korea, and more.< [MP3] >
  • How many animals besides humans are capable of learning from their peers? Luke Rendell discusses evidence for the cultural exchange of feeding behavior in humpback whales.
  • John Antoniadis introduces us to a highly unusual pulsar that validates Einstein's general theory of relativity despite its extreme environment.
  • Richard Stone describes the state of tuberculosis treatment in North Korea, a country that has one of the highest TB rates outside of sub-Saharan Africa.
(44 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

19 April 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to a special show on the grand challenges of education, including stories on science ed outside the pipeline, bettering undergrad education, and virtual labs.< [MP3] >
  • Is the science we learn in school important in our daily lives? Noah Weeth Feinstein makes the case for science education for non-scientists.
  • Jeffrey Mervis explains how Nobelist Carl Wieman is trying to improve science education for undergraduates.
  • Ton de Jong explains the importance of both physical and virtual laboratories in science and engineering education.
(44 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

12 April 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on locomotion in Australopithecus sediba, self-medicating animals, the hunt for dark matter, and more.< [MP3] >
  • A special issue this week presents a comprehensive examination of the anatomy of Australopithecus sediba. Jeremy DeSilva recounts how he and his team used the morphology of the lower body to learn more about the locomotion of these early hominins.
  • From pills and prescriptions to leaves and berries: Jacobus de Roode explains that medication in animals is far more commonly than previously thought.
  • Adrian Cho discusses the state of dark matter research, starting with recent measurements from the space-based Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer.
(44 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

5 April 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on the ethics of de-extinction, decoding dreams, more evidence for mantle plumes, and more.< [MP3] >
  • Technologies are being developed to bring extinct species back to life. But just because we can revive a species, should we? Henry Greely explores the ethical, political, and scientific implications of de-extinction.
  • Comparing fMRI scans of conscious to sleeping test subjects, Yukiyasu Kamitani and colleagues have found a way to identify the visuals in a subject's dream.
  • Richard Kerr explains the new seismic research that could end the debate about whether mantle plumes really exist.
(39 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

29 March 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on reprogramming cells for cancer, desert fairy circles, pyrotechnics at the center of the galaxy, and more.< [MP3] >
  • Part of a special issue on cancer genomics, Mario Suvà draws parallels between pluripotent stem cells and programmable cancer cells.
  • In answer to a long-standing mystery, Norbert Juergens points to sand termites as the cause of African fairy circles.
  • Awakening a sleeping giant: Ron Cowen explains why, late this year or early next, telescopes all over the world will be watching a gas cloud approach our galaxy's black hole.
(41 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

22 March 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on locomotion on flowing ground, mapping health, cellulosic ethanol for cars, and more. < [MP3] >
  • How do lizards traverse sandy terrains so easily, when humans have so much difficulty? Daniel Goldman discusses his team's investigation of the forces at play during locomotion on granular materials.
  • Douglas Richardson describes how new approaches to GIS, GPS, remote sensing and cartography are enabling researchers to spatialize health and disease data.
  • What's in your gas tank? Science News Writer Robert Service discusses the high hopes--and the challenges--that face the cellulosic ethanol industry.
(41 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

15 March 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on tracking single T cells, improving geoengineering policies, 10 years after SARS, and more. < [MP3] >
  • Carmen Gerlach explains the importance of T cell diversity and how to track down individual T cell fates in the human immune response.
  • Edward Parson recommends a framework for ending the political deadlock on geoengineering research, allowing some projects to move forward while mitigating risks.
  • Ten years later, are we better prepared? Dennis Normile discusses lessons learned from the 2003 SARS outbreak.
(43 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

8 March 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on quantum spintronics, the behavioral economics of retirement savings, the changing practice of oceanography, and more. < [MP3] >
  • David Awschalom introduces the concept of spintronics and its potential in quantum processing.
  • Are you saving enough money for retirement? Shlomo Benartzi discusses some workplace interventions that help employees save more.
  • Better technology, but less money: Eli Kintisch discusses the crossroads facing U.S. oceanography.
(42 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

1 March 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on counting the earth's radiation belts, the importance of wild pollinators, cyber attacks, and more. < [MP3] >
  • Daniel Baker discusses early findings from the newly-launched Van Allen Probes.
  • Lucas Garibaldi makes the case for adding wild insects to the mix of species that pollinate agricultural systems.
  • Richard Stone takes us inside recent cyber attacks from China.
(46 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

22 February 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on the cost-effectiveness of HIV treatment, nuclear testing in North Korea, preserving plant diversity, and more. < [MP3] >
  • Jacob Bor talks about extending life and saving money by scaling up HIV treatment in South Africa.
  • Is that legal? Richard Stone and Lassina Zerbo discuss North Korea's latest nuclear test.
  • As scientists store up the world's plant diversity in seed banks, they're running into a plant diversity problem: not all seeds can withstand freezing.
(32 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

15 February 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on uncertainty at the macroscopic level, pinning down cosmic rays, opsins outside the eyes, and more. < [MP3] >
  • Cindy Regal investigates a macroscopic analog of Heisenberg's uncertainty principle.
  • Where do cosmic rays come from? Stefan Funk finds clues in two nearby supernova remnants.
  • What are light-sensing proteins doing outside the eye? Elizabeth Pennisi explores opsins in eyeless creatures and other mysterious places.
(40 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

8 February 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on mercury-modifying bacteria, resuscitating vulture populations, China's focus on climate change, and more. < [MP3] >
  • Liyuan Liang answers the 40-year-old question of how bacteria methylate mercury in the environment.
  • Pollution, politics, and vultures: Andrew Balmford describes the accidental poisoning and subsequent resuscitation of vulture populations in India.
  • Christina Larson discusses the urgency of China's climate change research and presents some risk-mitigating strategies from climate scientists.
(41 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

1 February 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on the history of carbon cycling, emergent sensing, the Visualization Challenge, and more. < [MP3] >
  • John Higgins explains how an additional carbon sink in the past augments our modern understanding of the carbon cycle.
  • Getting schooled: Andrew Berdahl discusses the collective sensing behavior of fish.
  • Kerry Klein investigates the intersection of art and science with the announcement of the winners of the 2012 International Science & Engineering Visualization Challenge.
(42 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

25 January 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on uncertainty in proton sizing, naming all the species on the planet, crusading for science, and more. < [MP3] >
  • Aldo Antognini discusses the difficulty of determining the size of the proton.
  • Can we name all of Earth's species before they go extinct? Mark Costello thinks so.
  • Jennifer Couzin-Frankel profiles a pair of researchers crusading for better science.
(41 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

18 January 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on innovative imaging, anonymous genomes, the promise and perils of oxytocin, and more.< [MP3] >
  • John Hunt describes an innovative imaging tool for taking higher-efficiency microwave images.
  • Melissa Gymrek discusses the mechanics and consequences of determining an individual's identity from their genes.
  • Greg Miller describes the infectious excitement surrounding the hormone oxytocin - and why some temper that excitement with caution.
(37 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

11 January 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on China's one-child policy, anti-inflammatory therapy for chronic disease, selling expertise to investors and more. < [MP3] >
  • From a social economic perspective, Lisa Cameron discusses some of the consequences of China's one-child policy.
  • Ira Tabas reviews recent advances in anti-inflammatory therapies in treating and preventing chronic disease.
  • Deputy News Editor Jeffrey Mervis highlights the promise and peril of so-called "expert networks."
(43 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

4 January 2013

Science Podcast: Listen to stories on the end of history illusion, negative absolute temperatures, the death of a star, and more.< [MP3] >
  • Daniel Gilbert explains that despite our expectations, we continue to change—and speculates about why we have so many illusions about our future selves.
  • What could be hotter than infinitely hot? Ulrich Schneider discusses the mathematical and physical reality of negative absolute temperatures.
  • News Writer Yudhijit Bhattacharjee chronicles the speedy discovery of a supernova as well as the human story behind it.
(31 minutes)
[Transcript of this podcast]

Podcast content ©2005–2013 American Association for the Advancement of Science
Music ©2005–2013 Jeffrey E. Cook