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SARS Collection

Recently posted on Science Express: A study charting the molecular evolution of the SARS coronavirus as the 2003 epidemic unfolded in China. Also on this page: A special News Focus on the roots of the SARS epidemic in China, and free access to previous Science research papers on the animal hosts, genomics, epidemiology, and structural biology of SARS.


Molecular Evolution of SARS
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Molecular Evolution of the SARS Coronavirus During the Course of the SARS Epidemic in China
The Chinese SARS Molecular Epidemiology Consortium
Published online 30 January 2004, 10.1126/science.1092002
[Abstract][PDF]


Viruses isolated from patients early in the SARS epidemic resemble animal SARS-like viruses, and those from later patients show that the virus evolved rapidly and then stabilized.

Tracking Down the Animal Hosts of SARS
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Isolation and Characterization of Viruses Related to the SARS Coronavirus from Animals in Southern China
Y. Guan et al.
Science302, 276-278 (2003); published online 4 September 2003, 10.1126/science.1087139
[Abstract][Full text][PDF]Free Content

News: SARS Experts in China Urge Wider Animal Testing
Dennis Normile
Science301, 1303 (5 September 2003)
[Summary][Full text][PDF]

[Research paper is free to all visitors; full text of news article is available free to AAAS members or via individual article purchase.]
Civet cats, a raccoon dog, and a ferret badger in an animal market in Guangdong, China, were infected with a coronavirus identical to the one that causes SARS in humans save for an extra 29-nucleotide sequence.

Special News Focus: SARS in China
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China's Missed Chance
Martin Enserink
Science301, 294-296 (18 July 2003)
[Summary][Full text][PDF]

Tracking the Roots of a Killer
Dennis Normile and Martin Enserink
Science301, 297-299 (18 July 2003)
[Summary][Full text][PDF]

The Big Question Now: Will It Be Back?
Martin Enserink
Science301, 299 (18 July 2003)
[Summary][Full text][PDF]

[The full text of this Special Report is available free to AAAS members or via individual article purchase.]

Epidemiology of the SARS Outbreak
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Transmission Dynamics of the Aetiological Agent of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in Hong Kong: The Impact of Public Health Interventions
Steven Riley et al.
Science300, 1961-1966 (20 June 2003); published online 23 May 2003, 10.1126/science.1086478
[Abstract][Full text][PDF]Free Content

Transmission Dynamics and Control of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome
Marc Lipsitch et al.
Science300, 1966-1970 (20 June 2003); published online 23 May 2003, 10.1126/science.1086616
[Abstract][Full text][PDF]Free Content
Perspective: Modeling the SARS Epidemic
Chris Dye and Nigel Gay
Science300, 1884-1885 (20 June 2003); published online 23 May 2003, 10.1126/science.1086925
[Summary][Full text][PDF]Free Content
Analysis of the recent outbreak indicates that basic public health measures are sufficient to prevent a SARS epidemic.

Model of SARS Protease
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Coronavirus Main Proteinase (3CLpro) Structure: Basis for Design of Anti-SARS Drugs
Kanchan Anand, John Ziebuhr, Parvesh Wadhwani, Jeroen R. Mesters, Rolf Hilgenfeld
Science300, 1763-1767 (13 June 2003); published online 13 May 2003; 10.1126/science.1085658
[Abstract][Full text][PDF]Free Content
Structures on an essential protein of two coronaviruses and use of the genome sequence of the SARS coronavirus allows inferences that may help in designing a therapeutic drug.

The SARS Genome
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Characterization of a Novel Coronavirus Associated with Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome
Paul A. Rota et al.
Science300, 1394-1399 (30 May 2003); published online 1 May 2003, 10.1126/science.1085952
[Abstract][Full text][PDF]Free Content

The Genome Sequence of the SARS-Associated Coronavirus
Marco A. Marra et al.
Science300, 1399-1404 (30 May 2003); published online 1 May 2003, 10.1126/science.1085953
[Abstract][Full text][PDF]Free Content
Perspective: The SARS Coronavirus: A Postgenomic Era
Kathryn V. Holmes and Luis Enjuanes
Science300, 1377-1378 (30 May 2003)
[Summary][Full text][PDF]

[Research papers are free to all visitors; full text of Perspective is available free to AAAS members or via individual article purchase.]
The sequences of two isolates of the coronavirus associated with SARS show that it is not closely related to any of the previously characterized coronaviruses.

SARS Editorial
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Lessons from SARS
Barry R. Bloom
Science300, 701 (2 May 2003)
[Full-text PDF]Free Content

Additional SARS Content
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In addition to free genome papers linked above, we have put together a collection of additional Science news and commentary on the SARS epidemic. Unless otherwise noted, full-text access to the items below is available free of charge to Science individual and institutional subscribers; other users can access these articles on a pay-per-article basis. Information on AAAS membership, which includes a subscription to Science, can be found here.

Second Lab Accident Fuels Fears About SARS
Dennis Normile
Science303, 26 (2 January 2004)
[Summary][Full text][PDF]

SARS: A Pandemic Prevented
Martin Enserink
Science302, 2045 (19 December 2003)
[Summary][Full text][PDF]

Search for SARS Origins Stalls
Martin Enserink and Dennis Normile
Science302, 766-767 (31 October 2003)
[Summary][Full text][PDF]

Unexplained False Alarm May Hold Lessons
Martin Enserink and Dennis Normile
Science302, 767 (31 October 2003)
[Summary][Full text][PDF]

SARS Researchers Report New Animal Models
Martin Enserink
Science302, 213 (10 October 2003)
[Summary][Full text][PDF]

SARS Experts Want Labs to Improve Safety Practices
Dennis Normile
Science302, 31 (3 October 2003)
[Summary][Full text][PDF]

Singapore Lab Faulted in SARS Case
Martin Enserink
Science301, 1824 (26 September 2003)
[Summary][Full text][PDF]

Early Indications Point to Lab Infection in New SARS Case
Dennis Normile and Gretchen Vogel
Science301, 1642-1643 (19 September 2003)
[Summary][Full text][PDF]

Searching for a SARS Agenda
Martin Enserink
Science300, 1487-1488 (6 June 2003)
[Summary][Full text][PDF]

Clues to the Animal Origins of SARS
Martin Enserink
Science300, 1351 (30 May 2003)
[Summary][Full text][PDF]

Researcher Told to Stay Home After China Trip
Martin Enserink
Science300, 1216 (23 May 2003)
[Summary][Full text][PDF]

Flood of Sequence Data Yields Clues But Few Answers
Gretchen Vogel
Science300, 1062 (16 May 2003)
[Summary][Full text][PDF]

Hong Kong to Beef Up Monitoring
Dennis Normile
Science300, 1062 (16 May 2003)
[Summary][Full text][PDF]

Up Close and Personal with SARS
Dennis Normile
Science300, 886 (9 May 2003)
[Summary][Full text][PDF]

Battling SARS on the Frontlines
Dennis Normile
Science300, 714 (2 May 2003)
[Summary][Full text][PDF]

Hungry for Details, Scientists Zoom In on SARS Genomes
Martin Enserink and Gretchen Vogel
Science300, 715 (2 May 2003)
[Summary][Full text][PDF]

WHO Wants 21st-Century Reporting Regs
Martin Enserink
Science300, 717 (2 May 2003)
[Summary][Full text][PDF]

Modelers Struggle to Grasp Epidemic's Potential Scope
Gretchen Vogel
Science300, 558 (25 April 2003)
[Summary][Full text][PDF]

Calling All Coronavirologists
Martin Enserink
Science300, 413 (18 April 2003)
[Summary][Full text][PDF]

Deferring Competition, Global Net Closes In on SARS
Martin Enserink and Gretchen Vogel
Science300, 224 (11 April 2003)
[Summary][Full text][PDF]

A Second Suspect in the Global Mystery Outbreak
Martin Enserink
Science299, 1963 (28 March 2003)
[Summary][Full text][PDF]

Scientists Chase Fast-Moving and Deadly Global Illness
Martin Enserink
Science299, 1822 (21 March 2003)
[Summary][Full text][PDF]


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