Abstract
Full Text
A Class of Microstructured Particles Through Colloidal Crystallization
Orlin D. Velev, Abraham M. Lenhoff, and Eric W. Kaler

Supplementary Material

Web figure 1. Examples of different initial shapes of the template droplets that can be realized by varying the effects of gravity and the interfacial tensions. (A) Small, nearly spherical droplet suspended at liquid-air interface. (B) Flat discoidal or ellipsoidal droplet at liquid-air interface. (C) Lens at liquid-air interface at high γ02. (D) Spherical droplet suspended under microgravity. (E) Nearly spherical droplets suspended under simulated microgravity. (F) Nearly hemispherical droplets under simulated microgravity and low γ13. (G) Droplets suspended at lower liquid-air interfaces. (H) Droplets suspended at liquid menisci of complex shape.


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Web figure 2. Particles from 270-nm latex immersed in water; the domain boundaries are emphasized. Scale bar, 500 μm.


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Web figure 3. Particles from 630-nm latex; note the changes in colors and appearance. Scale bar, 500 μm.


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Web figure 4. Toroidal particles from 320-nm latex. Scale bar, 500 μm.


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Web figure 5. Toroids obtained in the presence of intermediate concentration (0.03 mM) of sodium perfluorooctanoate. The size of the openings can be controlled by the surfactant concentration; compare Figure 3, B and D. Scale bar, 500 μm.


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Web figure 6. SEM through the cross section of a broken toroidal particle.


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Web figure 7. SEM on the surface of a toroidal particle; the lower interfacial tension in the presence of surfactant allows the formation of step-wise boundaries between the domains on the surface.


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