Hajor/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)

King Tut’s burial chamber may hide secret second tomb

King Tutankhamun’s famously rich tomb has been painstakingly scrutinized for nearly a century, but it may still hide unexplored treasures—possibly even the tomb of the legendary Egyptian queen Nefertiti, National Geographic reports. The tomb, discovered in 1922, was thought to be fully explored by modern-day researchers. But in 2015, high-resolution laser scans suggested that additional chambers lay behind the walls of the pharaoh’s burial chamber. At the time, many dismissed the findings. But on Thursday, authorities announced that radar scans had confirmed the existence of two hidden chambers, with objects inside apparently made of metal and organic matter. No one knows yet what these objects are, but certain artifacts in King Tut’s tomb—which some scholars suggest appear to have been made for someone else—offer the tantalizing prospect that the hidden chambers could contain Nefertiti’s remains. Researchers will conduct more scans before making any plans to excavate the chambers. 

*Correction, 21 March, 2:07 p.m.: The date of the high-res scans of the tomb has been corrected to 2015. We regret the error.